Category Archives: dance history

Friends at the Theatre

Today I read Balanchine in the New York public library. Balanchine both personal and professional – the choreographer and dancer, the man and the lover.

Being somewhat familiar with the material (set texts for the next semester), I didn’t try to go in chronological order – I simply worked m way alphabetically down the list: from Acocella to Gottlieb, taking notes as I went. I took a break to grab a bagel. Before I knew it, hours had slipped by – I could happily have stayed for more.

I read about his material and his teaching style, recognizing fragments from my own classes. I learned that he shared tender evenings with a young Suzanne Farrell in an inn, and later a 24 hour Dunkin’ Doughnuts, only a few blocks from where I’m currently staying. I made a mental note to try and find them on my way home.

First though, the library was showing Cover Girl, a classic film from the 1940’s with Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly. Too much to hope for, I guess, that they’d be showing one with Balanchine’s choreography, although I did note some of his collaborators in the credits. Since this was a free screening on a Sunday, the room slowly began to populate with individuals somewhat older than myself.

The first friend I spotted was, unsurprisingly, Martha Graham, white hair in a bun, perching a few rows behind me. A wispy John Cage sat at my left shoulder, telling jokes through the opening credits; Maria Tallchief made elegant gestures from the front row as she conversed with a companion whose face I couldn’t see.

Mr. B. arrived just as the film was about to start, slipping through the door and taking a seat far right, missing nothing over his hawk-like nose. Merce Cunningham was conspicuous by his absence, although perhaps he could have been in the back – I don’t suppose it would have mattered to him.

The credits rolled.

For me New York is always the home of dance. This may well be a betrayal of both my geographic and pedagogic origins, but I am long since past caring – I’m a modern baby. The inn and the Dunkin’ Doughnuts have sadly gone, but the city, especially at Christmas, still reminds me why I love what I love, and chose to do what I do.

From Broadway, Manhattan, happy 2015.

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Ghosts in Dance

I was invited earlier this year to be part of a national conference on U.K. higher education.

I was part of a pannel presentation entitled “Ghosts in Dance Education,” where a number of lecturers from a variety of dance h.e. institutions brought foward provocations from the point of view of various disciplines within the field.  Guided by the student voice (played admirably by Julia Gleich), we were trying to find ways of integrating history into practice.   I was invited to speak for the ghost of Rudolph von Laban, which I did with utmost delight, producing a presentation that I believe will long remain a favourite in my body of work.  It’s very short, and you can see it here.

Did you get the joke?

Maybe not.  You have to have had some Laban training.  The joke is that the entire presentation is organised as the performance of one of Laban’s own movement scales, and the text is related to the positions prescribed by the training execise.

It became somehow a metaphor for what I believe about dance, the integration of theory and practice, of history in the present, and what it means to communicate knowledge.  I share it in the hope that it can remain alive and perhaps be disseminated further.  Discussion of the words, the presentation format or the blog post itself are warmly welcomed.

For more information on the rest of the Ghosts in Dance pannel and its conclusions, links are on their way.